Washington Minimum Wage Laws

Washington Minimum Wage Laws Federal minimum wage law is governed by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The current federal minimum wage rate is $7.25 per hour for nonexempt employees. The Washington Minimum Wage Act (WMWA) complements federal law and, in some cases, prescribes more stringent or additional requirements that employers in the state must follow. Whenever state and federal laws are different, the law that is more favorable to the employee applies. The Washington State Department of Labor and Industries (L&I)…

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Restaurant Revitalization Fund Accepting Applications

$29 Billion Restaurant Revitalization Fund Accepting Applications  Restaurants began submitting applications May 3, 2021, to the Small Business Association (SBA) for a grant program geared toward combating the economic impact of COVID-19 on the restaurant industry. The grant program, the Restaurant Revitalization Fund, was allocated $29 billion from the $1.9 trillion economic relief bill passed earlier this year. Through the fund, eligible restaurants can receive up to $10 million per business or up to $5 million for a single physical location. Recipients…

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Rhode Island Minimum Wage will Increase by 2025

Rhode Island Minimum Wage Rate Set to Increase to $15 by 2025 Rhode Island has amended its minimum wage law to raise the state’s minimum wage rate to $15 per hour by Jan. 1, 2025. Rhode Island Minimum Wage Rate The current minimum wage rate in Rhode Island is $11.50 per hour. Under state law, employers must pay their employees a wage rate that is at least equal to the state’s minimum wage rate. The minimum wage rate in Rhode Island will…

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Paid Sick Leave for Federal Contractors

Paid Sick Leave for Federal Contractors In 2015, the Obama administration established a requirement that federal contractors and subcontractors must offer paid sick leave to their employees. As a result, certain employers that contract with the federal government must provide their employees with up to seven days of paid sick leave annually, including for: Family care; and Absences resulting from domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. Federal contractors can lose eligibility for future government contracts or be subject to civil lawsuits if…

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Which Federal Employment Laws Apply to My Company?

Which Federal Employment Laws Apply to My Company There are a number of different federal employment laws that have their own rules for covered employers. Employers should be aware of the federal employment laws that may apply to their company. An employer’s size, or number of employees, is a key factor in determining which federal employment laws the employer must comply with. Some federal laws, such as the Equal Pay Act (EPA), apply to all employers, regardless of size. However, other laws,…

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